How Do We Eliminate Poverty? These 8 Books Create A Great Roadmap

Poverty in America is much different from poverty in India. From here in America, to the poorest nations of the world, poverty is an issue, and is one of the great balancing acts we face in this new century.

photo by: Peter Alfred Hess
 

How Do We Eliminate Poverty? A daunting question and an even more daunting task.  It’s tough to define the world let alone solve this enormous issue, because it means something different in many areas of the world. Poverty in America is much different from poverty in India. From here in America, to the poorest nations of the world, poverty is an issue, and is one of the great balancing acts we face in this new century. Of course poverty has been around forever, but this age is different, because we can see it. We can see images, videos, and easily venture to these places of extreme poverty. That is why this century is different, we have individuals seeing, documenting, and understanding this issue more than we have ever had. With so many opinions and even more questions out there, this task as become ever more relevant in our age of globalization. These 8 books give in great detail the different views of poverty around the world and what it will take to improve poverty rates. From here in America to the poorest nations in the world, poverty is an issue, and is one of the great balancing acts we face in this new century.

 

The American Way of Poverty: How the Other Half Still Lives


by Sasha Abramsky:

Fifty years after Michael Harrington published his groundbreaking book The Other America, in which he chronicled the lives of people excluded from the Age of Affluence, poverty in America is back with a vengeance. It is made up of both the long-term chronically poor and new working poor—the tens of millions of victims of a broken economy and an ever more dysfunctional political system. In many ways, for the majority of Americans, financial insecurity has become the new norm.

The American Way of Poverty shines a light on this travesty. Sasha Abramsky brings the effects of economic inequality out of the shadows and, ultimately, suggests ways for moving toward a fairer and more equitable social contract. Exploring everything from housing policy to wage protections and affordable higher education, Abramsky lays out a panoramic blueprint for a reinvigorated political process that, in turn, will pave the way for a renewed War on Poverty.

 

When Helping Hurts: How to Alleviate Poverty Without Hurting the Poor . . . and Yourself


by Steve Corbett and Brian Fikkert

With more than 225,000 copies sold, When Helping Hurts is a paradigm-forming contemporary classic on the subject of poverty alleviation and ministry to those in need. Emphasizing the poverty of both heart and society, this book exposes the need that every person has and how it can be filled. The reader is brought to understand that poverty is much more than simply a lack of financial or material resources and that it takes much more than donations and handouts to solve the problem of poverty.

While this book exposes past and current development efforts that churches have engaged in which unintentionally undermine the people they’re trying to help, its central point is to provide proven strategies that challenge Christians to help the poor empower themselves. Focusing on both North American and Majority World contexts, When Helping Hurts catalyzes the idea that sustainable change for people living in poverty comes not from the outside-in, but from the inside-out.

 

Poor Economics: Rethinking Poverty and the Ways to End it


by: Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo

Why do the poor borrow to save? Why do they miss out on free life-saving immunizations, but pay for unnecessary drugs? In Poor Economics, Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo, two practical visionaries working toward ending world poverty, answer these questions from the ground. In a book the Wall Street Journal called “marvelous, rewarding,” the authors tell how the stress of living on less than 99 cents per day encourages the poor to make questionable decisions that feed—not fight—poverty. The result is a radical rethinking of the economics of poverty that offers a ringside view of the lives of the world’s poorest, and shows that creating a world without poverty begins with understanding the daily decisions facing the poor. The Economist’s Free Exchange Blog, “Let me recommend it… Poor Economics is more than just a compendium of the randomistas’ greatest hits. For one thing, it contains some well-observed reporting.”

 

The International Bank of Bob: Connecting Our Worlds One $25 Kiva Loan at a Time


by: Bob Harris

Hired by ForbesTraveler.com to review some of the most luxurious accommodations on Earth, and then inspired by a chance encounter in Dubai with the impoverished workers whose backbreaking jobs create such opulence, Bob Harris had an epiphany: He would turn his own good fortune into an effort to make lives like theirs better. Bob found his way to Kiva.org, the leading portal through which individuals make microloans all over the world: for as little as $25-50, businesses are financed and people are uplifted. Astonishingly, the repayment rate was nearly 99%, so he re-loaned the money to others over and over again.

After making hundreds of microloans online, Bob wanted to see the results first-hand, and in The International Bank of Bob he travels from Peru and Bosnia to Rwanda and Cambodia, introducing us to some of the most inspiring and enterprising people we’ve ever met, while illuminating day-to-day life-political and emotional-in much of the world that Americans never see. Told with humor and compassion, The International Bank of Bob brings the world to our doorstep, and makes clear that each of us can, actually, make it better.

 

Banker To The Poor: Micro-Lending and the Battle Against World Poverty


by: Muhammad Yunus

Muhammad Yunus is that rare thing: a bonafide visionary. His dream is the total eradication of poverty from the world. In 1983, against the advice of banking and government officials, Yunus established Grameen, a bank devoted to providing the poorest of Bangladesh with minuscule loans. Grameen Bank, based on the belief that credit is a basic human right, not the privilege of a fortunate few, now provides over 2.5 billion dollars of micro-loans to more than two million families in rural Bangladesh. Ninety-four percent of Yunus’s clients are women, and repayment rates are near 100 percent. Around the world, micro-lending programs inspired by Grameen are blossoming, with more than three hundred programs established in the United States alone.

Banker to the Poor is Muhammad Yunus’s memoir of how he decided to change his life in order to help the world’s poor. In it he traces the intellectual and spiritual journey that led him to fundamentally rethink the economic relationship between rich and poor, and the challenges he and his colleagues faced in founding Grameen. He also provides wise, hopeful guidance for anyone who would like to join him in “putting homelessness and destitution in a museum so that one day our children will visit it and ask how we could have allowed such a terrible thing to go on for so long.” The definitive history of micro-credit direct from the man that conceived of it, Banker to the Poor is necessary and inspirational reading for anyone interested in economics, public policy, philanthropy, social history, and business.

 

The Poverty of Nations: A Sustainable Solution


by: Barry Asmus and Wayne Grudem

The whole world has a stake in the war against poverty and leaders across the globe are looking for a permanent solution. That’s why economist Barry Asmus and theologian Wayne Grudem have teamed up to outline a robust proposal for fighting poverty on a national level. These two experts believe the solution lies in a comprehensive development plan that integrates the principles of a free market system with the Bible’s teachings on social ethics. Speaking to the importance of personal freedom, the rule of law, private property, moral virtue, and education, this book offers a clear path for promoting economic prosperity and safeguarding a country’s long-term stability—a sustainable solution for a world looking for the way forward.

Barry Asmus (PhD, Montana State University) is a senior economist at the National Center for Policy Analysis, a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting private sector, market-based solutions to economic growth and development. Named by USA Today as one of the five most requested speakers in the United States, Asmus has been writing and speaking on political and business issues for over 25 years. He has twice been voted the Outstanding Professor of the Year and has received the Freedom Foundation at Valley Forge Award for Private Enterprise Education.

Wayne Grudem (PhD, University of Cambridge; DD, Westminster Seminary) is research professor of theology and biblical studies at Phoenix Seminary, having previously taught for 20 years at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Grudem earned his undergraduate degree at Harvard University, as well as an MDiv from Westminster Seminary.

 

Portfolios of the Poor: How the World’s Poor Live on $2 a Day


by: Daryl Collins, Jonathan Morduch, Stuart Rutherford, and Orlanda Ruthven

Nearly forty percent of humanity lives on an average of two dollars a day or less. If you’ve never had to survive on an income so small, it is hard to imagine. How would you put food on the table, afford a home, and educate your children? How would you handle emergencies and old age? Every day, more than a billion people around the world must answer these questions. Portfolios of the Poor is the first book to systematically explain how the poor find solutions to their everyday financial problems.

The authors conducted year-long interviews with impoverished villagers and slum dwellers in Bangladesh, India, and South Africa–records that track penny by penny how specific households manage their money. The stories of these families are often surprising and inspiring. Most poor households do not live hand to mouth, spending what they earn in a desperate bid to keep afloat. Instead, they employ financial tools, many linked to informal networks and family ties. They push money into savings for reserves, squeeze money out of creditors whenever possible, run sophisticated savings clubs, and use microfinancing wherever available. Their experiences reveal new methods to fight poverty and ways to envision the next generation of banks for the “bottom billion.”

 

The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time


BY: Jeffrey D. Sachs

Jeffrey D. Sachs has been cited by The New York Times Magazine as “probably the most important economist in the world” and by Time as “the world’s best-known economist.” He has advised an extraordinary range of world leaders and international institutions on the full range of issues related to creating economic success and reducing the world’s poverty and misery. Now, at last, he draws on his entire twenty-five-year body of experience to offer a thrilling and inspiring big-picture vision of the keys to economic success in the world today and the steps that are necessary to achieve prosperity for all.

Marrying vivid eyewitness storytelling to his laserlike analysis, Jeffrey Sachs sets the stage by drawing a vivid conceptual map of the world economy and the different categories into which countries fall. Then, in a tour de force of elegance and compression, he explains why, over the past two hundred years, wealth has diverged across the planet in the manner that it has and why the poorest nations have been so markedly unable to escape the cruel vortex of poverty. The groundwork laid, he explains his methods for arriving, like a clinical internist, at a holistic diagnosis of a country’s situation and the options it faces. Rather than deliver a worldview to readers from on high, Sachs leads them along the learning path he himself followed, telling the remarkable stories of his own work in Bolivia, Poland, Russia, India, China, and Africa as a way to bring readers to a broad-based understanding of the array of issues countries can face and the way the issues interrelate. He concludes by drawing on everything he has learned to offer an integrated set of solutions to the interwoven economic, political, environmental, and social problems that most frequently hold societies back. In the end, he leaves readers with an understanding, not of how daunting the world’s problems are, but how solvable they are—and why making the effort is a matter both of moral obligation and strategic self-interest.

 

Related Post: The Socially Responsible Watch That Empowers Children In Poverty

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Grant Trahant

Founder at Causeartist
Founder of Causeartist + Social Entrepreneur + Partner at Charity Charge + Journey of the Soul: Album on Apple Music, Spotify, Pandora, and Tidal all sales and streaming royalties go to support impact projects around the world.
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Written by Grant Trahant

Founder of Causeartist + Social Entrepreneur + Partner at Charity Charge + Journey of the Soul: Album on Apple Music, Spotify, Pandora, and Tidal all sales and streaming royalties go to support impact projects around the world.